Ley Lines

A web of lines both in the human body and on the ground is an idea prevalent in many magical traditions. The earth’s electromagnetic field varies significantly from place to place and there is much evidence to suggest that these fields effect our feelings. Perhaps this is why we feel good in certain places and not so good in others? 

If it is true that the earth is covered in such a web of subtle energies, what would happen if you were to walk the threads of this web with heightened awareness, pausing at certain spots – or ‘nodes’ where the threads cross in order to meditate or find inspiration?

In Australia, the aboriginals did just that, linking tribal stories and customs with ancient places so they can rediscover their essential selves by walking the ‘songlines’ connecting these places. In England, this was once possible too although now only fragments of these ancient tales exist. Nonetheless, some believe enough remains allowing us to touch history in this same amazing way by walking along that which is known as ley lines.

One is the St Michael Line, which sweeps from Land’s End in Cornwall through Glastonbury and other standing stones and monuments to the Norfolk coast. Indeed Hamish Miller has written an amazing book (The Sun and Serpent, Mythos, 1990) suggesting that actually there are two lines not one, presenting male and female energy. The lines coil around each other like mating snakes, hence the name of his book. 

Miller also found that these energies manifest with both lighter and darker ‘intentions’, and so if you’re heading out to walk some ley lines or dabble with similar energies, take care.

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2 responses to “Ley Lines”

  1. I read once that churches were bild on Ley lines in the past, because of the positive fibe

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