Feminism

if you were a literary agent …how would you respond?

Dear Ms Agent,

In the aftermath of The Great War when Europe is cloaked in social disillusionment, twenty-four year old, newly widowed, Sophie de Belcoupe returns home to Paris. With conventional ideals of the feminine thwarted, she determines it’s through art that she will forge her future.

Complications arise when, by accepting a job on a design project directed by her beloved, Uncle Maurice, she reencounters Andrew John Hancock, the young American artist with whom she’d once been in love.

As the project prospers so does Sophie and Andrew’s relationship. But both crash to a halt when, to cover his own misdoings, Uncle Maurice accuses Andrew of embezzlement. While clearing his reputation, Andrew uncovers dangerous secrets about Sophie’s family – secrets which blow apart her idea about who and what she was about.

Using old-fashioned philosophy and new-fangled psychology, Sophie  pieces herself together only to discover what she’d been led to believe she didn’t want, was precisely that which she did, the love of the man who honours her above all others.

According to Simone de Beauvoir, women are made, not born. The struggles of brave women like Sophie played a vital role in shaping twentieth century ideas of what it meant to be a modern woman. My complete 95,000 word historical romance, Adieu The Rose, further explores this theme, offering today’s women a unique view on their struggle to shape what it means to be a post-modern woman in the equally challenging twenty-first century.

I’m approaching you because of your excellent track record with unusual historical romance novels.

May I send you a synopsis and the first three chapters?

Regards,

DA Hopeful

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