Buildings burn & economies crumble – the Pluto/Uranus Square

Buildings burn across Britain.  In the Middle East, dictatorships crumble . The Euro-zone is in meltdown and the political system in America brings the world’s largest economy to the brink of default.

What gives?

The current Pluto Capricorn/ Uranus in Aries Square symbolising that which we’re going to experience for the next six years.  Hold on to your hats, ladies and gents.  It’s going to be a rough ride.

It all started in 1965 and 1966 when Uranus and Pluto were three times conjunct in Virgo (wholeness/integrity).  During that time, the revolt of students in Berkeley ignited a series of similar events all over the world – remember the Negro riots in Watts?  I do.  It wasn’t a pretty sight.

The divide between the haves and the have not’s had been widening and the ‘powers’ that be weren’t doing enough.  We’re now living through the opening square of that 1965-66 conjunction.  This brings a significant manifestation regarding unfinished business.  The issues represented by that 1965-66 conjunction are erupting yet again – but this time on a broader and more dangerous scale.

The Uranus/Pluto cycle has to do with radical restructuring and destructuring.  The vision is of a freer and more meaningful life.  Our unquestioned acceptance of authority is broken.  We’re fed up with petty materialism and mindless obedience.  The systems of our society aren’t working.  This is what the youth are trying to tell us.   Yet because the Uranus/Pluto cycle takes 127 years to completion, don’t expect an all-encompassing solution soon.

Rousseau’s Social Contract & Why the Rich Get Richer While the Poor Get Poorer

My husband and I recently visited a charming 280-acre National Trust property nestled in the green hills of south Oxfordshire.  First built in the late Middle Ages, Greys Court comprises a substantial complex of sandstone buildings and walled courtyard gardens.  Enjoying coffee and cake in a long, low building said to have garrisoned Cromwell’s soldiers during the Civil War, we contemplated battles long since fought and won. With dozens of other tourists, we rambled  through the three-gabled Elizabethan house dreaming of what it must have been like to have grown up  in such a comfortable and privileged home .

But it was while admiring century-old wisteria awash in a sea of bluebells that I remembered Rousseau’s observation that the ‘fruits of the earth belong to us all, and the earth itself to nobody’.  If this were true, then why do some families flourish on 280 acre country estates while others scratch out their survival in a city slum? Rousseau suggests a diabolically simple answer:

“The first man who having enclosed a piece of ground, thought up the statement this is mine and found people simple enough to believe him…was the real founder of civil society.”

Society yes.  Civil no.  It was Rousseau’s view that the social contract devised by men to make their property secure was not in accord with the ‘natural order’, but instead was a hoax perpetrated by the rich on the poor.  In other words, the poor (majority) had been tricked into agreeing to give their right to share in the wealth of the land to the rich (minority).   According to Rousseau in exchange for peace and protection:

“All ran headlong to their chains, believing they had secured their liberty.”

I question whether such a social contract remains in society’s best interest in the 21st century.  Do we still require privileged property owners to care for us?  Or in a post-modern democracy are we capable to taking care of ourselves?

If we conclude the later, then is it not up to each one of us work toward changing the terms of the social contract?  Do we really want that in the interests of all, the rich get richer while the poor get poorer?

Or might we rather like it the other way around?

The (Philosophical) Demise of Democracy

Of late, there’s been much debate about the collapse of authority in the UK.   It would appear a consensus  of sorts has finally been reached this is not a good thing.  However the hope is the new government will sort it all out for us.  I wonder.

In The Republic, Plato reminds us that just as surely as Democracy evolves from Oligarchy (a system of government where the rich rule the poor), that Democracy evolves into Tyranny.  While the first transition results from an excess of wealth, the later results from an excess of freedom.  He provides some startlingly scary examples of the warning signs:

“Father and son, citizen and foreigner, old and young are all on a level; fathers and teachers fear their sons and pupils, and the wisdom of the young man is a match for the elder, and the old imitate the jaunty manners of the young because they are afraid of being thought morose.  Slaves are on level with their masters and mistresses, and there is no difference between men and women.  Nay, the very animals in a democratic State have a freedom which is unknown in other places.”

Plato then goes on to remind us that bloated with desire to do whatever we wish whenever we wish, the citizens of democracy will at last become so sensitive we no longer can endure ‘the yoke of laws’.

This is the beginning of the end.

“… for there is a law of contraries: the excess of freedom passes into the excess of slavery, and the greater the freedom the greater the slavery.”

It happens like this: because law and order have vanished, the disgruntled citizenry elect a champion to seize control.  All goes well until inevitably, the champion oversteps his bounds.  When the citizenry tries to remove him, they discover their champion turned tyrant is even more lawless than they.

I suggest that a little more respect for authority won’t kill us and in regards to freedom, a little less emphasis on our ‘rights’ might help us come to terms our  ‘responsibilities’.   Don’t leave the preservation of what you hold most dear to the government.  You might not be too pleased if you do.

Clegg & Cameron in Composite

Typically used for astrological assessment of romantic relationships, a composite chart gives insight into the thurst of the combined energy of two people.

The highlights of the composite of Britain’s two new leaders: (1) Libra moon (naturally adaptive ability  to smooth trouble situations and reconcile conflicts of opinion), (2) Jupiter in Leo (ambitious, warm and dignified approach to exercise of power), and (3) Sun,Venus,Mercury stellium in Sagittarius ( bright, lively, and enthusiastic expansion of philosophic ideals).

Further, when compared to Britain’s own natal chart*, we find that (1) diplomatic composite Libra moon within minutes of Britain’s MC (place in the world from point of view of others), (2) in sextile (working easily and effectively) with that warm and ambitious composite Jupiter, and (3) in sextile (again, working easily and effectively) with those bright and enthusiastic ideals of the Sagittarius stellium.   Not only that, but that shiny stellium is placed right at Britain’s ASC (way of experiencing itself in the world).

Most astrologers would agree, these placements did not occur by accident.

So what might it mean for Britain’s future?  I predict a warm, open, and enthusiasm approach to  governance that will heal our cynical view of politics (and politicians).  It may also signify a return to world preeminence for Britain in the role of diplomacy and mediation.  Fingers crossed that I’m right.

*12 April 1927 (0.01)/London, UK