imagesThe Greek bailout and why it’s so likely to go all wrong:

  • Mercury is conjunct Mars suggesting this bailout was the result of some very angry communication.
  • Not only that, but the Mercury/Mars conjunction is opposite Pluto suggesting some serious, underhanded, manipulation – Pluto is always coercive and brings out the worst in any situation – not the best energy for striking long-lasting bargains.
  • That Mercury/Mars conjunction is also trine Neptune suggesting at best disillusion (which first requires illusion) and at worst, deliberate telling of untruths. Any way you look at it, things aren’t what they look to be.
  • Jupiter is closely conjunct Venus suggesting indulgence that will be hard to control – Jupiter expands whatever it touches and Venus is known for tending to live beyond its means – especially if the conjunction is troubled by other planets.
  • Which it is – this is a close trine to Uranus which can be symbolised by the Tarot card, the Tower destroyed by lightening. This is an electric energy – highly unstable albeit idealistic and forward thinking.
  • Not only that, but that Jupiter/Venus conjunction is square Saturn – if grand plans (Jupiter) about finance (Venus) are going to be manifest (Saturn) there should not be such a seesaw between optimism and doubt. As one astrologer astutely put it, Jupiter in square aspect to Saturn suggests lack of inner conviction (a square being what it sounds like – being between a rock and a hard spot – trying to fit a round peg into a square hole).
  • But the crux of any matter in the world of mundane astrology is the position of the Moon – which in this case is in Gemini. This suggests highly spirited communication and ideas –which in and of itself isn’t bad. But one can’t eat and drink ideas – and because the moon in mundane astrology denotes the general public, we can imagine that because of the sextile of this Moon with that highly explosive Uranus, we should expect some outbreaks of political tension.bailout chart

IShakespeare's Richard IIIn the times of William Shakespeare, the ‘stars’ were always a force with which men must reckon. There’s no doubt that in those days, the world was viewed as ‘fated’ – and whether this was a reflection of the ancient cosmos where the gods pulled all the strings or an inherent recognition of what Carl Jung would later posit about the covert operations of the unconscious, we will never know.

But we do know that the idea of ‘fate’ as shown in the ‘stars was woven oft through his work:

Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,

Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated sky

Gives us free scope, only doth backward pull

Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull.

(All’s Well that Ends Well, 1.1.209), Helena

Having just finished reading Shakespeare’s play Richard III, I wondered how Richard was ‘fated’ to stack up?180px-Richard_III_of_England

Ptolemy identified six levels of fame/success:

  1. Kings & Princes

Both luminaries in masculine signs and at least one of them to be found in an angle. This alone is pretty good. However – as well, they (both) be attended by a doryphory (including rays)  composed of all five planets – then this is REAL GOOD. In addition this rank is helped if the planets in the doryphories are also in the angles or configured with the MC.

  1. Chieftain

The Sun only masculine with the Moon feminine and only one of them in an angle. If both, however, have good doryphories as described above, then the person will reach chieftain level, with the power to judge life and death. NOTE – a good doryphory has  benefics in good shape or on angles (or ruling them).

  1. Governor or Commander

If the natal chart has the luminaries as for a Chieftain but the doryphories do not involve the angles, these people will not be invested with sovereignty, but will reach eminence.

  1. Civil Leader

If neither of the luminaries be in the angles, but both have good doryphories which are in the angles or ruling the angles, they will have a leadership role in their community. Councillor, President of a club, Mayor of a small town and so on.

  1. Undistinguished

If however, neither luminary is in an angle (Sun still masculine and Moon feminine), and the attending planets are not involved with the angles by placement or rulership, then the person will lead a humble life.

  1. Lowest Level

If neither luminary be found in a masculine sign, nor in an angle, nor attended by any benefics they will live lives of “quiet desperation” and obscurity.

Richard III

  1. Sun in Libra (in fall) in a masculine sign succedent in the 11th house – OK – but could be better – the 7th house Moon in Taurus is in a feminine sign but it is angular and exalted) so overall this is pretty OK.
  2. This might get him to Chieftain level if the doryphories of one or both of the luminaries is strong.
  3. The doryphory is an interesting technique focusing on the ‘retinue’ of helpers either of the two lights or luminaries (i.e. sun or moon) have in their ‘train’. The more planets in the retinue, the more helpers and if additionally those helpers were themselves strong the more help they could give. Imagine yourself a feudal lord trying to raise an army to fight a foe – the more rich/strong neighbours (i.e. able to raise their own armies) you have supporting your cause, the more likely you were to succeed.
  4. Note that when considering if a planet throws a ‘ray’ into the doryphory, benefics (Moon, Venus, Jupiter, Mercury, and the Sun) can only do so by sextile or trine and the malefics (Saturn and Mars) can only do so by opposition or square.
  5. Richard III’s solar doryphory (i.e. attendants to his sun at 17 Libra) is as follows: Because the sun’s retinue PROCEEDS him, we look to other planets in either Libra (18 -30 degrees) or Scorpio:
    1. Saturn in Libra (exalted) and succedent
    2. Mercury in Scorpio
    3. Venus in Scorpio (in detriment) yet angular
    4. Jupiter in Aquarius (retrograde) throws a ray into Libra by trine
  6. Richard III’s lunar doryphory (i.e. attendants to his moon at 28 Taurus is as follows: Because the moon’s retinue FOLLOWS her, we look to planets either in Taurus (29-30 degrees Taurus) or Aries:
    1. Mars in Aries – strong by rulership but not angular
    2. Jupiter casts a ray into Aries by sextile
  7. A solar doryphory of four planets isn’t bad – but none of these four are in rulership by sign or term – and although Saturn is exalted, Venus is in detriment (alternative) – but she rules the DSC angle (Taurus). Mercury is reasonable shape and also rules the MC angle. Likewise Jupiter is in reasonable shape in Aquarius and rules the IC angle – so overall pretty good
  8. A lunar doryphory of only 2 planets is not so good – But that Mars is so powerful (albeit also retrograde) that it alone could win the day – not to mention that it is the chart ruler because Scorpio is rising. This means Mars rules this angle. Mars is further empowered by being in reception with the Sun (the Sun is exalted in Aries so that Sun in Libra- charming and strategic – gives all it has to Mars. Being retrograde does not impede its power but will effect the outcome in the sense that this power is never really under control.
  9. Overall, this gets Richard III to chieftain level – but not to King – and that shouldn’t be surprising because although he was crowned king, it was only because he killed off or pushed aside all others entitled to wear the crown. He held the throne for only two years before being toppled himself by Henry Tudor (who’d been smart enough to remain in France whilst Richard was bumping folks off), whose claim to the throne was much stronger.

The following is a flash fiction written during a meeting of my writer’s group in September 2013:

Hens & Chicks

hens and chicks

“Think he’ll make anything himself?” asked Mother Hen.

“Undoubtedly, my son will be President of United States of America,” replied Papa Hen. “If we can elect a black man and a scarlet woman to the highest post in the land, there’s no reason our Ralphie can’t make it.”

While nosing her chicks toward Farmer Brown’s corn and barley grain, Mother Hen considered her husband’s statement. Indeed, after the recent election of Ms. Sarah Green-Peas (no relation to the Jolly Green Giant of frozen peas fame), there seemed no limits to what the American people might do. If Ms. Green-Peas, a belly dancer from New Hampshire, could capture the heart of the nation, then there was no reason her chick might not do the same.

“Mama?” Suzie Q stopped pecking and cocked her furry yellow head. “Penny for your thoughts?”

“A penny won’t get you far these days, sister,” chuckled Ralphie. “When I’m president , I’ll see to it that a penny buys each and every chicken in America a full bale of hay.”

While nosing her chicks to the pond behind Farmer Brown’s stately grey slate mansion, Mother Hen considered her son’s statement and wondered where he could have learned so much about political economics. Last she knew, neither Harvard nor Stanford accepted chickens for full matriculation although, interestingly, Notre Dame had just taken in a lamb.

“When’s dinner ready?” demanded Papa Hen. “I got an overpowering urge for scrambled eggs. I stopped by the duck pond next door on my way home from the office and wouldn’t you know it, I found four just laying there.”

Although she really didn’t approve, Mother Hen cooked the eggs to perfection. She was a good wife and mother.  But she had always wondered if there might be something wrong with a man who was prepared to eat another’s children? She hoped Ralphie wouldn’t grow up to be like his father but she supposed that he probably would.

After all, to be President of the United States of America, a chicken would have to do whatever it was that a chicken had to do.”

Buildings burn across Britain.  In the Middle East, dictatorships crumble . The Euro-zone is in meltdown and the political system in America brings the world’s largest economy to the brink of default.

What gives?

The current Pluto Capricorn/ Uranus in Aries Square symbolising that which we’re going to experience for the next six years.  Hold on to your hats, ladies and gents.  It’s going to be a rough ride.

It all started in 1965 and 1966 when Uranus and Pluto were three times conjunct in Virgo (wholeness/integrity).  During that time, the revolt of students in Berkeley ignited a series of similar events all over the world – remember the Negro riots in Watts?  I do.  It wasn’t a pretty sight.

The divide between the haves and the have not’s had been widening and the ‘powers’ that be weren’t doing enough.  We’re now living through the opening square of that 1965-66 conjunction.  This brings a significant manifestation regarding unfinished business.  The issues represented by that 1965-66 conjunction are erupting yet again – but this time on a broader and more dangerous scale.

The Uranus/Pluto cycle has to do with radical restructuring and destructuring.  The vision is of a freer and more meaningful life.  Our unquestioned acceptance of authority is broken.  We’re fed up with petty materialism and mindless obedience.  The systems of our society aren’t working.  This is what the youth are trying to tell us.   Yet because the Uranus/Pluto cycle takes 127 years to completion, don’t expect an all-encompassing solution soon.

My husband and I recently visited a charming 280-acre National Trust property nestled in the green hills of south Oxfordshire.  First built in the late Middle Ages, Greys Court comprises a substantial complex of sandstone buildings and walled courtyard gardens.  Enjoying coffee and cake in a long, low building said to have garrisoned Cromwell’s soldiers during the Civil War, we contemplated battles long since fought and won. With dozens of other tourists, we rambled  through the three-gabled Elizabethan house dreaming of what it must have been like to have grown up  in such a comfortable and privileged home .

But it was while admiring century-old wisteria awash in a sea of bluebells that I remembered Rousseau’s observation that the ‘fruits of the earth belong to us all, and the earth itself to nobody’.  If this were true, then why do some families flourish on 280 acre country estates while others scratch out their survival in a city slum? Rousseau suggests a diabolically simple answer:

“The first man who having enclosed a piece of ground, thought up the statement this is mine and found people simple enough to believe him…was the real founder of civil society.”

Society yes.  Civil no.  It was Rousseau’s view that the social contract devised by men to make their property secure was not in accord with the ‘natural order’, but instead was a hoax perpetrated by the rich on the poor.  In other words, the poor (majority) had been tricked into agreeing to give their right to share in the wealth of the land to the rich (minority).   According to Rousseau in exchange for peace and protection:

“All ran headlong to their chains, believing they had secured their liberty.”

I question whether such a social contract remains in society’s best interest in the 21st century.  Do we still require privileged property owners to care for us?  Or in a post-modern democracy are we capable to taking care of ourselves?

If we conclude the later, then is it not up to each one of us work toward changing the terms of the social contract?  Do we really want that in the interests of all, the rich get richer while the poor get poorer?

Or might we rather like it the other way around?

Of late, there’s been much debate about the collapse of authority in the UK.   It would appear a consensus  of sorts has finally been reached this is not a good thing.  However the hope is the new government will sort it all out for us.  I wonder.

In The Republic, Plato reminds us that just as surely as Democracy evolves from Oligarchy (a system of government where the rich rule the poor), that Democracy evolves into Tyranny.  While the first transition results from an excess of wealth, the later results from an excess of freedom.  He provides some startlingly scary examples of the warning signs:

“Father and son, citizen and foreigner, old and young are all on a level; fathers and teachers fear their sons and pupils, and the wisdom of the young man is a match for the elder, and the old imitate the jaunty manners of the young because they are afraid of being thought morose.  Slaves are on level with their masters and mistresses, and there is no difference between men and women.  Nay, the very animals in a democratic State have a freedom which is unknown in other places.”

Plato then goes on to remind us that bloated with desire to do whatever we wish whenever we wish, the citizens of democracy will at last become so sensitive we no longer can endure ‘the yoke of laws’.

This is the beginning of the end.

“… for there is a law of contraries: the excess of freedom passes into the excess of slavery, and the greater the freedom the greater the slavery.”

It happens like this: because law and order have vanished, the disgruntled citizenry elect a champion to seize control.  All goes well until inevitably, the champion oversteps his bounds.  When the citizenry tries to remove him, they discover their champion turned tyrant is even more lawless than they.

I suggest that a little more respect for authority won’t kill us and in regards to freedom, a little less emphasis on our ‘rights’ might help us come to terms our  ‘responsibilities’.   Don’t leave the preservation of what you hold most dear to the government.  You might not be too pleased if you do.

Typically used for astrological assessment of romantic relationships, a composite chart gives insight into the thurst of the combined energy of two people.

The highlights of the composite of Britain’s two new leaders: (1) Libra moon (naturally adaptive ability  to smooth trouble situations and reconcile conflicts of opinion), (2) Jupiter in Leo (ambitious, warm and dignified approach to exercise of power), and (3) Sun,Venus,Mercury stellium in Sagittarius ( bright, lively, and enthusiastic expansion of philosophic ideals).

Further, when compared to Britain’s own natal chart*, we find that (1) diplomatic composite Libra moon within minutes of Britain’s MC (place in the world from point of view of others), (2) in sextile (working easily and effectively) with that warm and ambitious composite Jupiter, and (3) in sextile (again, working easily and effectively) with those bright and enthusiastic ideals of the Sagittarius stellium.   Not only that, but that shiny stellium is placed right at Britain’s ASC (way of experiencing itself in the world).

Most astrologers would agree, these placements did not occur by accident.

So what might it mean for Britain’s future?  I predict a warm, open, and enthusiasm approach to  governance that will heal our cynical view of politics (and politicians).  It may also signify a return to world preeminence for Britain in the role of diplomacy and mediation.  Fingers crossed that I’m right.

*12 April 1927 (0.01)/London, UK