Narrative Coaching

When it comes to coaching models, it is certainly not the case that one size fits all. So far, the one that I like most is called Narrative Coaching. It’s described as a ‘mindful, experiential and holistic approach’ to shift my client’s stories thereby generating new options for desired change. The idea is that stories… Continue reading Narrative Coaching

Disguise as a Device in Renaissance Drama

If as postmodern philosophers like Foucault have suggested, the ‘self’ is narrated into existence by the stories that we and others tell us about us, then this ability to be someone else allows the disguised character to disconnect with his/her story and play an entirely different one to great effect.

Tradition and Form in Renaissance Tragedy

The form of English tragedy has most certain evolved over time – with Chaucer it was a ‘ditty’ about prosperity ending in wretchedness whist in later periods it had morphed into sad stories about a man’s fall as told by his ghost. By the 15th and early 16th century, we see the so-called ‘everyman (morality) plays’ – whereby on actor represents all of mankind with angels and the like tempting him to do evil with a view to investigating notions of Christian salvation.

The Significance of Humoural Theory in Early Modern Drama

In his essay Hamlet and His Problems, TS Eliot (81-87) concludes that such refusal leaves Hamlet ‘dominated by an emotion’ which ‘is inexpressible’ – he can neither ‘understand’ nor ‘objectify’ it – and if a key character such as Hamlet remains inexpressible on stage, then as Eliot suggests the play is an ‘artistic failure’.

New Criticism – its usefulness & drawbacks

However there is also significant room to argue as does Willingham, that New Criticism is intellectually naïve in the sense that for although we can never know for certain how the greater context in which it was written influences the text, we can be certain that it has indeed influenced it and if we ignore that influence then we have lost a great deal from our aesthetic experience.

Freedom and Power in English Renaissance Revenge Tragedy

However in The Duchess of Malfi there is room to argue that Duke Ferdinand, as head of the household qua government is corrupt. Most certainly at times he borders on depravity and his elder brother, the Cardinal of Aragon, says as much: ‘(w)hy do you make yourself (s)o wild a tempest?’ (II v 17-18).

The Fatness of Falstaff & the politics of redemption

At the end of the day it is not Wonga’s owners (nor their equity investors) who will pay for its redemption but those two million customers who have already paid interest rates in excess of 5,000% (APR). Likewise, at the end of the day it is not Hal (nor his family) who will pay for his redemption but Falstaff.

Tatterhood – a Norwegian Fairy-tale/original drama

Tatterhood (A Norwegian Fairy-tale) / original drama by Debra Moolenaar   Players: Daisy (D)– the beautiful daughter Bella Dona (BD)– the ugly daughter with her goat and wooden spoon Queen Jessamine (QJ)– the Queen Pansy (P) – the maid Christmas Eve witch (CEW) ___________________________ (continued – previously, encouraged by her maid, Pansy,  Queen Jessamine ate… Continue reading Tatterhood – a Norwegian Fairy-tale/original drama

Tatterhood (A Norwegian Fairytale)/ Original Drama

Tatterhood (A Norwegian Fairytale) / Original Drama by Debra Moolenaar Players: Daisy (D)– the beautiful daughter Bella Dona (BD)– the ugly daughter with her goat and wooden spoon Queen Jessamine (QJ)– the Queen Pansy (P) – the maid Christmas Eve witch (CEW) ACT ONE / SCENE ONE QJ:       Where is my maid? Why is it so… Continue reading Tatterhood (A Norwegian Fairytale)/ Original Drama

The Prodigal Son (act one of a new play)

THE PRODIGAL SON By Debra Moolenaar ( a short play inspired by Camus’ “The Outsider”) Act One NARRATOR: (to us.)  Listen up.  Your life may depend on it.   Think you can play around and not get burned?  Think again. MRS NOVAK:    Let me get this straight, Mr Kermak.  You want me to believe you once… Continue reading The Prodigal Son (act one of a new play)